Foreign Asset Reporting For The 2018 Tax Year

Foreign Asset Reporting For The 2018 Tax Year

Foreign Asset Reporting For The 2018 Tax Year

Due to recent changes, the deadline for filing the FBAR is the same as for a federal income tax return. This means that the 2018 FBAR, Form 114, must be filed electronically with the Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (FinCEN) by April 15, 2019. FinCEN grants filers missing the April 15 deadline an automatic extension until Oct. 15, 2019, to file the FBAR.

Deadline For Reporting Foreign Accounts

In general, the filing requirement applies to anyone who had an interest in, or signature or other authority, over foreign financial accounts whose aggregate value exceeded $10,000 at any time during 2018. Because of this threshold (and the constant fluctuations in exchange rates) taxpayers with foreign assets to check if this filing requirement applies to them.

Most U.S. Persons Abroad Need To File

An income tax filing requirement generally applies even if a taxpayer qualifies for tax benefits, such as the Foreign Earned Income exclusion or the Foreign Tax credit, which substantially reduce or eliminate U.S. tax liability. These tax benefits are only available if an eligible taxpayer files a U.S. income tax return.

A special extended filing and payment deadline applies to U.S. citizens and resident aliens who live and work abroad. For U.S. citizens and resident aliens whose tax home and abode are outside the United States and Puerto Rico, the income tax filing and payment deadline is June 17, 2019.

Interest, currently at the rate of 6 percent per year, compounded daily, will apply to any payment received after the regular April 15 deadline.

Nonresident aliens who received income from U.S. sources in 2018 also must determine whether they have a U.S. tax obligation. The filing deadline for nonresident aliens is April 15.

Special Income Tax Return Reporting For Foreign Accounts And Assets

In addition to the annual Report of Foreign Bank and Financial Accounts (FBAR) requirements outlined above, federal law requires U.S. citizens and resident aliens to report any worldwide income, including income from foreign trusts and foreign bank and securities accounts. In most cases, affected taxpayers need to complete and attach Schedule B to their tax return. Part III of Schedule B asks about the existence of foreign accounts, such as bank and securities accounts, and usually requires U.S. citizens to report these items for the country in which each account is located.

Also, separate from the foreign accounts reporting requirements above, certain taxpayers may also have to complete and attach to their return Form 8938, Statement of Specified Foreign Financial Assets. Generally, U.S. citizens, resident aliens and certain nonresident aliens must report specified foreign financial assets on this form if the aggregate value of those assets exceeds certain thresholds. See the instructions for this form for details.

At Horizon Expat Tax, We Can Help

Ask about our new client promotions today!

At Horizon Expat Tax we are happy to provide the following quality services:

  • U.S. taxes for taxpayers worldwide
  • U.S. Tax services for individuals immigrating to the U.S.
  • Tax preparation and advisory for U.S. non-residents with U.S. reporting requirements (temporary U.S. work, U.S. rental property, etc)
  • Small business tax compliance, advisory, and bookkeeping services

Any tax advice herein is based on the facts provided to us and on our interpretation of tax legislation as it reads at the time the advice is provided. Tax law is subject to continual change, at times on a retroactive basis and may result in incremental taxes, interest or penalties. We are not responsible for updating our advice for changes in law or interpretation after the date the advice is provided. Every tax situation is different. We are not responsible for the tax implications to any individual or entity that may act on this advice.